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Can I Stop Paying Child Support If I Don’t See My Kids

Can I Stop Paying Child Support If I Don’t See My Kids

When parents separate or divorce, child support payments are often put in place to ensure the well-being of the children involved. But what happens if a parent no longer sees their kids? Can they stop paying child support? In many cases, the answer is no. Even if you don’t see your children, you are still obligated to financially support them.

Violating a child support order can have serious consequences, including legal repercussions and potential financial penalties. If you find yourself in a situation where you no longer have contact with your children but are still required to pay child support, it is important to seek legal advice.

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What Does Best Interest of the Child Mean in Arizona

What Does Best Interest of the Child Mean in Arizona

The legal definition of “best interest of the child” in Arizona is primarily outlined in Arizona Revised Statutes (ARS) §25-403. This statute provides a framework for judges when making decisions about parenting time and custody. The law requires that all court decisions concerning children must prioritize the child’s best interests above all else, ensuring decisions promote their emotional and physical health, and overall welfare.

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When Can I Stop Paying Spousal Support

When Can I Stop Paying Spousal Support

Spousal support, also known as alimony, is a common issue in divorces where one spouse may be required to make regular payments to their former partner. However, many people wonder when they can stop paying spousal support. The answer to this question largely depends on the terms outlined in the support order.

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Divorce Mediation Vs Litigation in Arizona

Divorce Mediation Vs Litigation in Arizona

In many cases, divorce mediation is the best choice for couples looking for a more cooperative and less confrontational way to dissolve their marriage. Mediation offers the opportunity for both parties to work together with a neutral mediator to come to a mutually agreed upon settlement. This can save time, money, and emotional stress compared to the more adversarial process of divorce litigation.On the other hand, divorce litigation involves going to court and presenting your case before a judge, who will ultimately make an informed decision on all unresolved issues. While litigation may be necessary in cases where mediation is not successful, many couples find that mediation is a more amicable and efficient way to handle their divorce proceedings in Arizona.

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My Ex-Spouse is Hiding Assets in Our Arizona Divorce

My Ex-Spouse is Hiding Assets in Our Arizona Divorce

Addressing undisclosed assets in an Arizona divorce involves different approaches before and after the divorce is finalized.Before finalization, it’s important to inform your legal representation about any suspicions of hidden assets.They can utilize legal discovery tools, such as subpoenas and depositions, to uncover these assets. Hiring a forensic accountant may also be beneficial for analyzing complex financial situations. If undisclosed assets are found, this information can significantly impact settlement negotiations for a more equitable division.

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Uncontested Divorce in Arizona Vs Contested Divorce

Uncontested Divorce in Arizona Vs Contested Divorce

Typically, a contested divorce in Arizona can take anywhere from several months to over a year. The average duration is around 12 to 18 months, but this timeframe can extend if the case is particularly complex or if there are significant delays in court proceedings or negotiations.Several factors influence the length of time a contested divorce might take, including the willingness of both parties to negotiate, the efficiency of the discovery process, and the availability of court dates. Moreover, if the divorce involves contentious issues such as child custody, division of substantial assets, or spousal support, this can further prolong the process.

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School Disagreements With Your Ex? De Novo Law Can Help

School Disagreements With Your Ex? De Novo Law Can Help

In Arizona, the ability of a co-parent to make unilateral decisions about a child’s education hinges on the type of legal decision-making authority awarded by the court. Under ARS §25-403, parents can have either joint or sole legal decision-making. In a joint arrangement, both parents must agree on major decisions, including those regarding their child’s schooling, preventing one parent from deciding without the other’s consent.Sole legal decision-making allows one parent to make significant educational decisions independently, although such decisions can be challenged in court if believed not to serve the child’s best interest.

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How to Establish Sole and Separate Property in Arizona

How to Establish Sole and Separate Property in Arizona

Arizona’s community property laws dictate that most property and debts acquired during the marriage are shared equally. However, separate property — assets owned before the marriage, gifts, and inheritances — typically remains with the individual who owns it. The process of distinguishing separate property from marital assets requires careful consideration and clear evidence. It involves understanding legal nuances and often, meticulous documentation to prove the ownership and nature of the assets. This process can be complex, especially when separate property has been mixed, or commingled, with marital assets. Whether you are just starting to consider divorce or are already in the midst of one, knowing how separate property is established in Arizona is a key step in ensuring a fair and equitable division of assets.

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My Ex Violated Our Child Custody Order, What Do I Do

My Ex Violated Our Child Custody Order, What Do I Do

When your ex violates your child custody order and diplomatic solutions falter, seeking a contempt hearing may be beneficial. This legal avenue prompts the court to not only enforce the custody agreement but also to potentially penalize the non-compliant party. If you find yourself contemplating this step, here’s a rundown of the process and its implications. The term ‘contempt of court’ in family law signifies your ex’s deliberate violation of the custody order. To set this legal process in motion, you need to file a motion for contempt with the same court that issued the initial custody order. This document should outline the specific instances where the custody order was violated.Backing your motion with substantial evidence is the next important step. This might include documented exchanges, detailed visitation records, or any other tangible proof demonstrating the breach of the custody arrangement. If the court greenlights your motion, it will schedule a hearing. This is your platform to explain the violation’s nature and its repercussions on your child.
The consequences for your ex, if found in contempt, can range widely based on the violation’s severity and the court’s judgment. Options include granting additional parenting time to compensate for missed visits, imposing monetary penalties, mandating attendance in parenting classes, or, in serious scenarios, incarceration.

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Special Needs Children and Child Custody Agreements

Special Needs Children and Child Custody Agreements

At De Novo Law, we specialize in tackling cases involving child custody for special needs children. This article offers insights into the implications of a special needs child turning 18 and the importance of special needs trusts as well as various other topics. Our Legal Paraprofessionals offer a distinct approach compared to traditional family law attorneys. Paraprofessionals are licensed to provide legal services in family law, including complex child custody cases involving special needs children. They differ from attorneys in their focused expertise and the ability to offer more accessible and affordable legal support. If you are dealing with child custody matters involving a special needs child, De Novo Law offers a free initial consultation to help you determine the best course of action.

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Is My Common Law Marriage Valid in Arizona?

Is My Common Law Marriage Valid in Arizona?

Common law marriage is a concept that has been around for centuries and continues to be a topic of interest in family law. In Arizona, however, common law marriage is not recognized, which can lead to some unique legal challenges for couples who consider themselves to be husband and wife without a formal marriage certificate.
Whether it’s understanding the legal implications of not being recognized as a married couple in the eyes of the state or seeking affordable legal services to protect each other’s rights and assets from a common law marriage originating in another state, a legal paraprofessional can provide much-needed guidance and support.

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How Do Community Property Laws Affect Property Division in Arizona

How Do Community Property Laws Affect Property Division in Arizona

Arizona is a community property state, which means that all property and debts acquired during a marriage are considered community property and are subject to division in the event of a divorce. However, there are certain assets that may be considered separate property, such as inheritances or gifts received by one spouse. When going through a divorce in Arizona, it is important to understand the complexities of property division in order to ensure a fair and equitable distribution of assets.

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DISCLAIMER: The content of this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide legal advice.  De Novo Law, LLC and its Legal Paraprofessionals are not attorneys and are not authorized to provide legal advice or representation beyond the areas and scope of practice for which license is held.  The transmission or receipt of any electronic correspondence or information does not create a legal paraprofessional-client relationship.

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